Momentum Physical Therapy

How We Treat

Physical therapy includes the evaluation and treatment of patients with pain, impairments, functional limitations, disabilities, or changes in physical function or health status resulting from disease, injury, surgery, or other causes.

We treat these patients through physical and mechanical means: that is, through:

  • Instruction / education, including functional training with various assistive devices and adaptive equipment
  • Posture and body mechanics training (ergonomics, proper sitting and lifting, daily activities)
  • Therapeutic exercise
  • Hands-on techniques (manual therapy including joint and soft tissue mobilization)
  • Balance Activities
  • Various forms of heat and cold
  • Modalities (machines that utilize electric current or ultrasound)
  • Other mechanical devices such as mechanical traction
  • Although we do not prescribe medicine, we can work closely with your physician if medications are indicated.

Our Process For Treatment

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The process begins when you develop a problem. Often times you will go to your physician who prescribes physical therapy (PT). His/her office can fax us a prescription, along with your insurance and contact information. We will then call you and schedule your initial appointment. *It is important to note that you have the legal right to go to the physical therapy clinic of your choice.

You can also schedule PT directly, without a physician’s referral. Just call us to make an appointment. [If you have Medicare, you can schedule a visit without a referral as long as you have a physician we can notify who will sign off on our plan of care.]

On your first appointment, we ask you to arrive 15 minutes early to fill out paperwork. When completed, the PT will take you in a treatment room and talk with you about your condition and your goals for PT. He/she will then perform a thorough examination. Afterwards, we discuss with you our findings, our diagnosis, and our plan to help your condition. Often, treatment is started that day, depending on your problems. After the visit is finished, you will schedule your appointments with our front office. We make every effort to work with your schedule to give you the days and times that are most convenient. Usually you will be scheduled for 2-3 times per week, for 3-4 weeks, but this of course can vary greatly depending on your needs (see “common diagnoses and treatment”).

During the course of your treatments, you can plan on being here about 1 hour, but your therapist can be more specific after your first visit. Because we know your time is valuable, you will be seen within 10 minutes of your appointment time. The treatment is modified based on how you respond, and is constantly adjusted to meet your goals.

On your last scheduled visit, we determine whether to continue or discharge. We consider many factors when making this determination.

  • Have you met your goals?
  • Are you improving at a significant pace?
  • Do you still require the skills of a PT?
  • Can you continue your rehab and recovery without PT?

We make this determination with your input. If we decide to continue, then we schedule the frequency and duration we think you will need to meet your goals.

If we decide on discharge, we will give you a home program so that you can continue your improvement and maintain your gains. We also offer a Wellness Program where you can continue to exercise independently in our facility for a nominal monthly fee.

Treatment Definitions

Activities of Daily Living (ADL) training

We work towards enabling you to perform everyday activities such as dressing, cooking, your mobility, bathroom skills, etc.

Adaptive Equipment

Equipment that makes it easier to perform normal activities, and to compensate for disabilities.

Assistive Devices

Various types of Walkers, Canes, Crutches.

Balance Activities

Activities that challenge your balance, with the assistance of the PT. These are usually done in conjunction with therapeutic exercises.

Cryotherapy

Various forms of cold treatment including ice packs, ice massage, and “Spray and Stretch” (for stretching muscles).

Electric Stimulation

A device that uses electric current to reduce pain and inflammation.

Evaluation

Includes an examination (history and physical examination), and clinical jusdgements of the PT based on the data obtained from the examination.

Fine motor Training

Working on small coordinated movents like picking up small objects or buttoning your clothing.

Gait training

Teaching you how to walk or run normally, or with assistive devices.

Hydrocollator Packs

Moist heat packs.

Instruction / Educations

On the initial visit, we explain all of our findings, and show you exactly what is going on using models, pictures, and demonstrations. We instruct you as to activity modification, ergonomics, correct posture and body mechanics, and exercises you can perform at home to speed your recovery. You are discharged wth a home exercise program (HEP) to continue your recovery.

Iontophoresis

A device that uses electrical current to drive medication through the skin in lieu of an injection.

Manual Therapy

A broad term that includes hand-on treatments such as joint and soft tissue mobilization.

Mobilization

Hands-on techniques that move a joint or soft tissue (skin, muscle, fascia) in a way the patient is unable to move, which decreases pain and/or inflammation, and increases movement and allows the muscles to operate more efficiently.

Modalities

A group of devices using various forms of energy such as ultrasound, heat, cold, and electricity.

Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

A device that uses electrical current to increase muscle strength and to retrain and facilitate muscle contraction.

Neuromuscular Techniques

Certain exercises and techniques use to facilitate or inhibit certain muscle groups.

Orthotics

Splints, braces, and inserts including custom made foot shoe orthotics.

Physical Therapist (PT)

Professionals educated at the accredited college or university level, who are required to pass the state board exam and to be licensed in the state in which they practice. They are trained in patient evaluation and treatment.

Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA)

Personnel educated at an accredited associate degree level, who are required to pass the state board exam and to be licensed in the state in which they practice. Their training is primarily in patient treatment methods and techniques, and operates under the supervision of a Physical Therapist.

Physical Therapy Technician (PT Tech)

Other personnel that assist the PT and PTA is certain direct and indirect aspects of patient care.

Plan of Care (POC)

This is our general plan for your treatment, and includes treatment options, goals, and the frequency / duration. The POC is merely a guideline because your treatment is adjusted as needed to meet your goals.

Propriocetion Activities

Proprioception is position sense, or knowing where parts of your body are in space. If you close your eyes and position your arm in a certain way, you know where your arm is without looking. Proprioception is often adversely affected, which can cause other problems such as joints moving incorrectly, poor reaction time and re-injury. This is a critical component of balance.

Prosthetic training

Teaching amputees how to use their prosthesis.

Stabilization Exercises

Exercises to stabilize a particular area of the body (usually the shoulder or spine) to control unwanted or uncontrolled joint movement, thereby decreasing pain.

Therapeutic Exercise

Exercises specific to your particular condition. They can include exercises to increase strength and/or motion, endurance, aerobic conditioning, to facilitate or inhibit certain muscle groups and improve joint mechanics and coordination. Various equipment is used including elastic, weight machines, free weights, manual resistance or assistance, elliptical trainers, treadmills, bikes, seated steppers, etc. We begin with very light exercise, and progress per your tolerance and response.

Traction, Mechanical

A pneumatic device that applies traction to your neck.

Transcutaneous Electrical nerve Stimulation (TENS)

A portable device that uses electric current to control pain.

Ultrasound

A device that used sound waves to heat deep tissue and to decrease swelling and pain.

Common Diagnosis & Treatment

Ankle Sprains

Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-6 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain and swelling, joint mobilizations and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics and balance.

Back and neck pain

Including: sprain / strain, whiplash, arthritis, degeneration, spurs, bulging or herniated disks, stenosis, weakness, post surgery Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 2-8 weeks Treatment: Initially modalities, soft tissue and joint mobilization, and light movements to decrease pain. Then as the pain subsides, we progress to more specific exercises, based on your diagnosis and response to treatment, to increase motion, strength, and proprioception. Activity modification, correct posture, lifting, and general body mechanics, core strengthening and stabilization are emphasized.

Difficulty with balance or walking

Including: due to inactivity or specific conditions that affect balance or walking Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-8 weeks Treatment: Stretching tight tissue and strengthening specific muscles that are found to be limited and that are important for balance. You are challenged with particular balance activities, under close supervision, to increase reaction time. You are given a few simple exercises to perform at home to support what we do in the clinic.

Hip pain / dysfunction / post-operative

Including: sprain / strain, arthritis, bursitis, swelling, degeneration, tendonitis, total and partial hip replacements. Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 2-4 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain, joint mobilizations and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening and stabilization exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics and balance

Knee pain / dysfunction

Including: sprain / strain, arthritis, bursitis, swelling, degeneration, tendonitis, various tears, patello-femoral syndrome, meniscal tears Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 2-4 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain, joint mobilizations and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening and stabilization exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics and balance.

Knee post-operative

Including: ACL reconstruction, meniscal repairs, debridements, knee replacements Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-12 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain, joint mobilizations, range of motion and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening and stabilization exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics and balance. When applicable, we work within your surgeon’s protocol to ensure a positive outcome.

Shoulder pain / dysfunction

Including: including sprain / strain, arthritis, bursitis, degeneration, rotator cuff tendonitis, impingement syndrome, various tears, frozen shoulder, dislocations. Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-8 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain, joint mobilizations and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening and stabilization exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics.

Shoulder post-operative

Including: rotator cuff repairs, shoulder replacements, debridements, labral repairs Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-12 weeks Treatment: Modalities to control pain, joint mobilizations, range of motion and stretching to restore motion, specific strengthening and stabilization exercises, and proprioceptive activities for proper joint mechanics and balance. When applicable, we work within your surgeon’s protocol to make ensure a positive outcome

Stroke

Frequency: 2-3 times per week for 4-12 weeks Treatment: We work on all of the limitations identified on your evaluation, including stiffness, weakness, difficulty with mobility and walking and balance, increased or decreased tone / spasticity, and motor skills and coordination. If a device such as a cane or walker is required, we teach you to use it and eventually try to wean you off of it, if appropriate. We suggest other equipment or devices to make you more independent.